Restaurant Recommendation: Mistral

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Princeton, New Jersey’s Mistral opened in 2013 with a splash. The shared plates menu made a big impression on New Jerseyans seeking something globally inspired yet close to home. Now, Mistral has added to its growing empire (which also includes the award-winning elements in the Princeton location) and opened a spin-off in the King of Prussia Mall in February 2017. 

“While we were originally questionable about opening at a mall, we saw a lot of potential for the restaurant in the area. There are some great local purveyors and farms in the area to gather ingredients from and develop new flavors with. In addition to heavy foot traffic at King of Prussia, we were intrigued by the corner location and strong outdoor seating area,” says Stephen Distler, co-owner. 

The 3,700-square-foot restaurant offers seating for 111 guests, including an 18-seat bar, and as weather permits, outdoor seating for 48. Groups can either buy out the entire restaurant or enjoy a semiprivate area. Like its Princeton cousin, Mistral is decidedly modern. “Unlike many of the chain restaurants surrounding Mistral KOP, Mistral KOP offers diners an independent, chef-driven menu concept that can be seen throughout the taste, style and atmosphere of the restaurant. Food activists and culinary pioneers Executive Chef Scott Anderson and Chef de Cuisine Craig Polignano place a superlative emphasis on sourcing local ingredients from Montgomery County to impress diners with the freshest flavors available in Montco,” adds Distler. 

Sophisticated Italian cooking designed for sharing transports guests to Italy.

 

As Marcella Hazan explains in the introduction to her “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking,” the varying languages, climates, geography, history and local ingredients that defi ne Italy’s diverse regions make it diffi cult to classify one single cooking style as representative of the entire country’s cuisine. Rather, “It is the cooking that spans remembered history, that has evolved during the whole course of transmitted skills and intuitions in the homes throughout the Italian peninsula and the islands, in its hamlets, on its farms, in its great cities.